The Syn is Dead/Long Live the Syn

An autopsy of student anarchism.

As a spectator of the burgeoning activism scene on campus, I’ve been struggling to keep track of the major players. Groups and causes at Yale have high turnover rates, and I’ve learned the hard way that it’s best not to get too attached. After all, it’s tough to have one’s heart set on Occupying Morgan Stanley when everyone else has long since begun Pushing for Divestment. But this year, I forgot about my pledge of disengagement. I chose to champion the Yale Syndicate, an underdog. . . Read more
Aliyya Swaby
A Conversation with Cord Jefferson

Cord Jefferson, editor at Gawker, sat down with The New Journal to discuss diversity in media today.

In early August, Cord Jefferson was hired as the West Coast Editor for online publication Gawker, after a job as a senior editor for GOOD magazine. In between editorial positions, Jefferson has built a rich repertoire of articles freelanced for outlets including The Nation, National Geographic, NPR and The Root. He often writes on topics related to race and class. He sat down with The New Journal to discuss diversity in media today. Aliyya Swaby: You’re the second black editor Gawker has ever had. Why. . . Read more
Aliyya Swaby
Registered Offense

The state’s system for regulating sex offenders, which has forced several to live in a hotel next to campus, is unjust and unsafe.

Hotel Duncan is tucked discreetly next to Yale University’s campus, on Chapel Street, across the street from an art school building. It is marked by a tall vertical sign with golden letters that no one seems to take the time to look up at. The hotel’s own Web site calls it “eccentric.” Online reviews of the hotel either excoriate its noisy heating system and stained amenities, or forgive the hotel’s drawbacks in view of its prices (around sixty dollars per night). The hotel claims to. . . Read more
Aliyya Swaby
One Man’s Trash

Yalies eat garbage, by choice?

...is another man's treasure. Aliyya Swaby As I hoisted myself into the dumpster, I could tell by the bulging garbage bags inside that we were in luck.  My guides for the night, two Yalies who live off-campus, were already tearing the bags apart in search of food to restock their refrigerator. At first, everything looked inedible, but when I began sorting through the bags, I quickly learned how to pick out the gems. Unbroken packaged items are usually safe. Meat is only good “in winter,. . . Read more
Aliyya Swaby