Interview with Leslie Jamison

TNJ sits down with Leslie Jamison to discuss switching genres, teaching writing, and talking to strangers.

A graduate of Harvard College and the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, Leslie Jamison is currently a Ph.D. candidate in English at Yale. Her first novel, The Gin Closet, was published in 2011. A book of essays, The Empathy Exams, was released this month. It explores questions of pain through personal and journalistic writing. She sat down with The New Journal to discuss switching genres, teaching writing, and talking to strangers. (This interview was conducted and condensed by Maya Averbuch and Julia Calagiovanni.) The New Journal: How. . . Read more
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Letter from the Editors

To our loyal readers.

Dear reader, Men joining roller derbies, theater with audience as actor, a stolen lamp that took a church’s history with it. Urban squash leagues and Tolstoy marathons. Budget cuts on food stamps and a gang initiative that tries to define community. The stories we’ve loved publishing in our five issues have been about borders of all kinds—about setting and learning them, about crossing or bridging them. Borders give us order, marking guarantees and edges. They tell us what we are, and help us decide who. . . Read more
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SIS, S.O.S.

The best of course evaluations.

As you write course evaluations for your fall classes or read them compulsively to pick your spring ones (and then throughout the semester to bask in what could have been), pick and choose from these categories of answers to: “How would you summarize this course for a fellow student? Would you recommend it to another student? Why or why not?” These quotes are real. So is their pain and their ecstasy. Short & sweet: Sure Matter of fact: I would recommend [Ethnography of Everyday Political. . . Read more
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Imperfect Pitch

A satire of the a capella rush process.

Illustration by Devon Geyelin. “DO YOU SING?” Yale boasts over four hundred active undergraduate organizations, but if you measure activity in terms of decibel levels, there is really only one to note. Every August, hordes of ardently chirpy a cappella singers descend upon timid freshmen continuously asking the dreaded question. Oh, you anxious-to-please freshmen, making bad jokes like, “Only in the shower!” “Well, I’m not going to quit my day job!” After the hundredth ask, even questions such as, “Are you mad at me?” and,. . . Read more
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A Conversation with Daniel Yergin

An interview with the founder of the New Journal.

Daniel Yergin founded the New Journal in 1967, the summer before his senior year at Yale. He then went onto study international relations at Cambridge as a Marshall scholar, start an energy consulting company called Cambridge Energy Research Associates, and win the Pulitzer Prize for his 1992 book The Prize. Yergin is one of the most quoted authors on energy issues. A revised paperback edition of his sixth book, The Quest: Energy, Security, and the Remaking of the Modern World—which the Economist called a “masterly piece of work”—is. . . Read more
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Letter from the Editors

TNJ editors and reporters consciously thought about issues of diversity as we worked on the October issue.

Dear Readers, On September 24, Newsweek published a cover with the large headline “MUSLIM RAGE” above a photo of screaming men, alluding to recent anti-U.S. protests in the Muslim world. Many respected media outlets denounced and mocked Newsweek for its sensationalist and simplistic portrayal of a diverse religious community. For the October issue of The New Journal, we interviewed Cord Jefferson, a contributing editor for Gawker, who argued this error could have been avoided by bringing more diversity into the newsroom itself. But the philosophy. . . Read more
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Letter from the Editors

The New Journal is instituting a new fact-checking system.

Dear Readers, This summer, one of The New Journal’s writers was accused of fabricating sources during her internship at a national newspaper. Our first reaction was surprise: why would an author fail to source? But the problem seems endemic to journalism—which raises questions about how publications should insure that readers trust what we print. Our experiences in the last few months made us realize the importance of fact checking in news and we decided to create a fact-checking process of our own at TNJ. TNJ. . . Read more
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A Conversation with Sarah Stillman

Sarah Stillman ’06, journalist, sat down with The New Journal for an interview.

Sarah Stillman '06, journalist, sat down with The New Journal for an interview. Reading Sarah Stillman’s resume is scary. Six years after she graduated from Yale with a Marshall Scholarship, as well as both Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in Anthropology, Stillman has written for The Nation, The Washington Post, The Atlantic.com, and The New Yorker. “The Invisible Army,” which The New Yorker published last June, is a finalist for a National Magazine Award. She sat down with The New Journal to talk about finding her. . . Read more
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A Talk with Gay Talese

The master of literary nonfiction speaks about his craft to a group of Yale student writers.

Gay Talese Gay Talese is widely recognized as a pioneer of literary nonfiction, a journalistic genre that uses artful writing to tell factually accurate narratives, the same type of journalism we publish in The New Journal. Earlier this year, one New Journal editor in Anne Fadiman’s nonfiction class was lucky enough to listen to Talese speak. Since our words cannot do justice to how Talese has shaped the field of literary journalism, we’ll let his speak for themselves. On nonfiction storytelling and history: You should. . . Read more
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Join The New Journal!

We have openings for publishers, writers, designers, and editors. Join today!

Join the New Journal! We have openings for publishers, writers, designers, and editors. Contact either Haley.Cohen@yale.edu or Kate.Selker@yale.edu if you would like to join us or have any questions about the magazine and its team.. . . Read more
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