The People at the Polls

On November 6, New Haven’s forty polling places were abuzz.

Two years into Donald Trump’s presidency, Americans are riled up. In the 2018 midterms, on November 6, an estimated 113 million of them flocked to the polls, marking the highest turnout rate in a midterm election since 1966. That energy spread to New Haven, where turnout spiked by more than 7,500 votes from 2014 to 2018. Some voters showed up out of concern for thwe state of the nation: people like Ananya Kumar-Banerjee, who led a group of Yale Democrats across the Green to register. . . Read more
Various Authors
Editors’ Note — Volume 51, Issue 2

Dear readers, It’s been quite a month. On September 23, The New Yorker reported that Debbie Ramirez had accused Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of exposing himself to her in a Lawrance dorm during their first year at Yale. Glued to the livestream between classes, Yale students watched the Senate Judiciary Committee interrogate a woman … Continue reading Editors’ Note — Volume 51, Issue 2

Dear readers, It’s been quite a month. On September 23, The New Yorker reported that Debbie Ramirez had accused Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of exposing himself to her in a Lawrance dorm during their first year at Yale. Glued to the livestream between classes, Yale students watched the Senate Judiciary Committee interrogate a woman eager to be “helpful” as she shared memories of trauma, and a graduate of our college who responded to allegations of assault with red-faced indignation. Our leaders –– nationally, and. . . Read more
Various Authors
Editors’ Note, Volume 50, Issue 5

Dear readers, The New Journal’s history begins in 1967, when our intrepid founders took it upon themselves to create a publication suited to cover the city and the University in an era of seismic change. This issue, we’re turning back the clock 175 million years, to another era of seismic change: the moment when Connecticut … Continue reading Editors’ Note, Volume 50, Issue 5

Dear readers, The New Journal’s history begins in 1967, when our intrepid founders took it upon themselves to create a publication suited to cover the city and the University in an era of seismic change. This issue, we’re turning back the clock 175 million years, to another era of seismic change: the moment when Connecticut broke off from Pangaea. In our first piece sponsored by the Edward B. Bennett III Memorial Fund, Christine Xu explores how Connecticut’s geological history has shaped New Haven’s development and. . . Read more
Various Authors
The Week After

New Haven communities react to Donald Trump’s election

On Election Day, New Haven was on the wrong side of a historic upset. Over thirty-four thousand Elm City voters cast ballots for Hillary Clinton; just under five thousand chose president-elect Donald J. Trump. After the race was over—settled in far-away places like southwest Virginia and Kenosha County, Wisconsin—the result dominated conversations all over the city, sparking endless debates about its significance and what to expect from a Trump presidency. The following vignettes are not meant to offer a comprehensive portrait of New Haven residents’. . . Read more
Various Authors