The Basement Curator

Yale senior Benji Fleischacker draws his bow across the cello’s strings and begins to play the opening note of Bach’s Cello Suite No. 1 in G Major. Under dim, red-tinted light, a crowd of students gathers around him. Some watch him with their mouths agape, but junior Brian Orozco stands with his eyes closed and … Continue reading The Basement Curator

Yale senior Benji Fleischacker draws his bow across the cello’s strings and begins to play the opening note of Bach’s Cello Suite No. 1 in G Major. Under dim, red-tinted light, a crowd of students gathers around him. Some watch him with their mouths agape, but junior Brian Orozco stands with his eyes closed and head bowed, as if in prayer. Fleischacker stops mid-song and softly taps Orozco with his bow: he needs Orozco to turn to the next page of sheet music. It takes. . . Read more
Felicia Chang
Eyes on the Pies

This past December, Mubarakah Ibrahim had a craving. It was sudden, as cravings tend to be, but this one nagged at her for months: she desperately wanted a bean pie. But there was a problem: bean pies—a black Muslim specialty made from navy beans, the favorite food of Nation of Islam leader Elijah Muhammad—are not … Continue reading Eyes on the Pies

This past December, Mubarakah Ibrahim had a craving. It was sudden, as cravings tend to be, but this one nagged at her for months: she desperately wanted a bean pie. But there was a problem: bean pies—a black Muslim specialty made from navy beans, the favorite food of Nation of Islam leader Elijah Muhammad—are not available in New Haven. Ibrahim, a Black, Orthodox Sunni business owner in New Haven, lived two hours away from New York City and the nearest bean pies. She was tempted. . . Read more
Charlie Bardey
Crafting a Public Square

In an alleyway off Chapel Street, across from the New Haven Green, a massive red shape seems to float in mid-air. From most angles, it looks like a collection of disjointed forms painted at random across the walls of the side street and a distant, spiraling parking garage. But from one privileged perspective, at the … Continue reading Crafting a Public Square

In an alleyway off Chapel Street, across from the New Haven Green, a massive red shape seems to float in mid-air. From most angles, it looks like a collection of disjointed forms painted at random across the walls of the side street and a distant, spiraling parking garage. But from one privileged perspective, at the entrance of the alley, the abstract streaks coalesce into a single form: a square poised on a vertex, with four circles cut away from its interior. The shape isn’t just. . . Read more
Chris Hays
Mapping a New Haven

A Yale senior builds an app to help refugees find resources.

Hundreds of refugees scrambled into the United States in early February after a Seattle judge halted President Donald J. Trump’s ban. While the Trump administration decides whether to appeal to the Supreme Court or rewrite the executive order altogether, people fleeing violence and persecution will continue trickling into the United States, seeking to build new lives from scratch. But what will the more than two hundred and fifty thousand refugees already living here tell these newcomers about American life? Where can they pray, buy familiar. . . Read more
Robert Scaramuccia
Preston and the Pipit

A sixteen-year-old bird watcher stumbles across something rare.

On a late October morning in 2016, a bird landed in the model airplane field at Sherwood Island State Park near Westport. At that time of year, this particular bird expected warm weather and the banks of the Mississippi. Here, it stood less than half a mile away from the cold Atlantic Ocean. It hid in the grassiest patch of the park among dried, golden reeds, far away from any of its kin. It had never been more lost. The same morning, sixteen-year-old Preston Lust. . . Read more
Elena Saavedra Buckley
Game Night in the New Country

An historic Italian-American club adapts to a changing city.

It’s Thursday night, and that means Bingo at the Annex Club, on the eastern side of New Haven’s harbor. The club was founded by Italian immigrants as a civic center for their community in 1938, but nowadays Bingo Night draws an ethnically diverse crowd of devotees. A woman in a blue hat with Bingomania written in rhinestone across the front and a man with a walker wait in a long line for concessions. In the large room where Bingo players wait at their tables for. . . Read more
Juliette Neil
Does the Frame Fit?

With plans to highlight its African art collection, the YUAG grapples with its limitations

When future visitors to the Yale University Art Gallery enter the lobby, they will turn to the left after checking their coats and see the new occupant of the museum’s coveted first-floor space: the African art collection. The Gallery is moving the collection from its current location upstairs to the first floor, one of the most prominent gallery spaces in the building. In the old exhibit, statues stood on island-like platforms around the room, masks hung from the walls, and artifacts rested in glass cases.. . . Read more
Bix Archer
Watching the King

The Death of Thailand’s Monarch Reaches New Haven

At Dwight Hall on October 18, the dress code is black. King Bhumibol Adulyadej of Thailand has died, and over one hundred people from Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island have congregated at a service organized by Thai undergraduates at Yale. Among the mourners are the staff of New Haven’s Thai and Thai-owned restaurants: Thai Taste, Pad Thai, Anaya’s Sushi, York Street Noodle Place, and Jeera Thai. As people come forward to place candles and flowers on the altar, they touch their brows to the ground. . . Read more
Chalay Chalermkraivuth
Seize the Pole

Wooster Square’s hottest fitness space is an empty dance studio with ten-foot metal poles bolted to the ground and ceiling. On a recent Sunday, a friend and I visited the studio, which sits in a small brick building across the street from Sally’s Apizza. It was a hot and humid day, and the last thing … Continue reading Seize the Pole

Wooster Square’s hottest fitness space is an empty dance studio with ten-foot metal poles bolted to the ground and ceiling. On a recent Sunday, a friend and I visited the studio, which sits in a small brick building across the street from Sally’s Apizza. It was a hot and humid day, and the last thing I wanted to do was exercise—especially when that exercise was pole dancing. A tall, lanky woman with pink-streaked, strawberry-blonde hair greeted us at the door. She wore a tight blue. . . Read more
Mikayla Harris
Camera Lucida

On his 784th day at Yale, John Chirikjian takes a picture of me in the bustling Branford dining hall. His camera is pressed close to his chest, and his dark eyes narrow. Then comes the click. Chirikjian pauses to compare this photo to the ten he has already taken today and to the thousands he … Continue reading Camera Lucida

On his 784th day at Yale, John Chirikjian takes a picture of me in the bustling Branford dining hall. His camera is pressed close to his chest, and his dark eyes narrow. Then comes the click. Chirikjian pauses to compare this photo to the ten he has already taken today and to the thousands he has taken during three-plus years at Yale. He won’t show me the shot before he leaves, tucking his camera to his side, but hours later I will find my own. . . Read more
Catherine Peng