Mapping a New Haven

A Yale senior builds an app to help refugees find resources.

Hundreds of refugees scrambled into the United States in early February after a Seattle judge halted President Donald J. Trump’s ban. While the Trump administration decides whether to appeal to the Supreme Court or rewrite the executive order altogether, people fleeing violence and persecution will continue trickling into the United States, seeking to build new lives from scratch. But what will the more than two hundred and fifty thousand refugees already living here tell these newcomers about American life? Where can they pray, buy familiar. . . Read more
Robert Scaramuccia
Preston and the Pipit

A sixteen-year-old bird watcher stumbles across something rare.

On a late October morning in 2016, a bird landed in the model airplane field at Sherwood Island State Park near Westport. At that time of year, this particular bird expected warm weather and the banks of the Mississippi. Here, it stood less than half a mile away from the cold Atlantic Ocean. It hid in the grassiest patch of the park among dried, golden reeds, far away from any of its kin. It had never been more lost. The same morning, sixteen-year-old Preston Lust. . . Read more
Elena Saavedra Buckley
Game Night in the New Country

An historic Italian-American club adapts to a changing city.

It’s Thursday night, and that means Bingo at the Annex Club, on the eastern side of New Haven’s harbor. The club was founded by Italian immigrants as a civic center for their community in 1938, but nowadays Bingo Night draws an ethnically diverse crowd of devotees. A woman in a blue hat with Bingomania written in rhinestone across the front and a man with a walker wait in a long line for concessions. In the large room where Bingo players wait at their tables for. . . Read more
Juliette Neil
Does the Frame Fit?

With plans to highlight its African art collection, the YUAG grapples with its limitations

When future visitors to the Yale University Art Gallery enter the lobby, they will turn to the left after checking their coats and see the new occupant of the museum’s coveted first-floor space: the African art collection. The Gallery is moving the collection from its current location upstairs to the first floor, one of the most prominent gallery spaces in the building. In the old exhibit, statues stood on island-like platforms around the room, masks hung from the walls, and artifacts rested in glass cases.. . . Read more
Bix Archer
Watching the King

The Death of Thailand’s Monarch Reaches New Haven

At Dwight Hall on October 18, the dress code is black. King Bhumibol Adulyadej of Thailand has died, and over one hundred people from Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island have congregated at a service organized by Thai undergraduates at Yale. Among the mourners are the staff of New Haven’s Thai and Thai-owned restaurants: Thai Taste, Pad Thai, Anaya’s Sushi, York Street Noodle Place, and Jeera Thai. As people come forward to place candles and flowers on the altar, they touch their brows to the ground. . . Read more
Chalay Chalermkraivuth
Seize the Pole

Wooster Square’s hottest fitness space is an empty dance studio with ten-foot metal poles bolted to the ground and ceiling. On a recent Sunday, a friend and I visited the studio, which sits in a small brick building across the street from Sally’s Apizza. It was a hot and humid day, and the last thing … Continue reading Seize the Pole

Wooster Square’s hottest fitness space is an empty dance studio with ten-foot metal poles bolted to the ground and ceiling. On a recent Sunday, a friend and I visited the studio, which sits in a small brick building across the street from Sally’s Apizza. It was a hot and humid day, and the last thing I wanted to do was exercise—especially when that exercise was pole dancing. A tall, lanky woman with pink-streaked, strawberry-blonde hair greeted us at the door. She wore a tight blue. . . Read more
Mikayla Harris
Camera Lucida

On his 784th day at Yale, John Chirikjian takes a picture of me in the bustling Branford dining hall. His camera is pressed close to his chest, and his dark eyes narrow. Then comes the click. Chirikjian pauses to compare this photo to the ten he has already taken today and to the thousands he … Continue reading Camera Lucida

On his 784th day at Yale, John Chirikjian takes a picture of me in the bustling Branford dining hall. His camera is pressed close to his chest, and his dark eyes narrow. Then comes the click. Chirikjian pauses to compare this photo to the ten he has already taken today and to the thousands he has taken during three-plus years at Yale. He won’t show me the shot before he leaves, tucking his camera to his side, but hours later I will find my own. . . Read more
Catherine Peng
New Bear On the Block

Connecticut’s growing bear population takes on the big city.

The black bear’s mother kicked him out of her den in northwestern Connecticut when he was seventeen months old, the equivalent of a human preteen. It was May 2016, she was ready to mate again, and black bears don’t usually hang around while their mothers prepare for new cubs. He had no resources, no skills, nowhere to go—just a nose for food and a desire to find females. Bears are a solitary and territorial species, and no one was trying to help him, either. If. . . Read more
Ruby Bilger
Play Bills

A theatrical social experiment asks participants to spend a pot of money

In an antechamber on the second floor of the Quinnipiack Club, a block from the New Haven Green, a group of mostly white adults mingles. One grey-haired, bespectacled gentleman chuckles in khakis and a sport coat. A middle-aged woman in capris and Asics sizes up the thirty-person crowd. Another woman, grinning and alone in an all-turquoise sweat suit, could easily be somebody’s grandmother. When Emily, an actor in a pinstripe skirt suit, enters through a pair of heavy wooden doors with a clipboard, Turquoise Grandma. . . Read more
Will Nixon
A Prize Of One’s Own

Windham-Campbell Literary Prize winners reflect on unexpected fame and money

As Aminatta Forna, a novelist raised in Sierra Leone and Great Britain, sat down to work in her office one morning in 2014, she noticed an email from an unknown address bolded in her inbox. The message informed her she had just been awarded a major literary prize, and with it, an enormous amount of money. Instinctively, she thought it was a scam—maybe one of those “Nigerian-based hoaxes that try to persuade you they have a huge amount of cash they just need to put. . . Read more
Frances Lindemann