Checked Out

When Neil Hughes works the front reception desk at the Mayflower Motel in Milford, Connecticut, he always stays alert. Nestled between car service stations in a retail area just off Interstate 95, the motel where he has been employed for the past eight years doesn’t look particularly vulnerable to crime: a table in the front … Continue reading Checked Out

When Neil Hughes works the front reception desk at the Mayflower Motel in Milford, Connecticut, he always stays alert. Nestled between car service stations in a retail area just off Interstate 95, the motel where he has been employed for the past eight years doesn’t look particularly vulnerable to crime: a table in the front office is scattered with cheap romance novels that visitors are invited to borrow; one wall is decorated with a playful plaque that reads, “I work 40 hours a week to. . . Read more
Antonia Ayres-Brown
Freedom of Mobility

After two heart attacks, a stroke, and thirty-seven days in the Palm Beach County Jail, Dennis DeMartin had grown tired of Florida. Following an incident that caused him to lose his Delray Beach condo, he moved into a federal housing project in New Haven called Bella Vista. His apartment is near the end of the … Continue reading Freedom of Mobility

After two heart attacks, a stroke, and thirty-seven days in the Palm Beach County Jail, Dennis DeMartin had grown tired of Florida. Following an incident that caused him to lose his Delray Beach condo, he moved into a federal housing project in New Haven called Bella Vista. His apartment is near the end of the 212 bus line, close to his childhood home in West Haven. Since he doesn’t own a car, the 212 is his only means of leaving the housing complex. “I live. . . Read more
Andrew Sandweiss
The House on Adeline Street

There’s a house on the corner of Adeline and Eddy Streets that doesn’t fit in. The rest of the block is lined with soft-colored clapboard houses with peeling paint or dented siding. Many are separated from the sidewalk by wire fences, some of which have begun to lean over or cave in. But 54 Adeline … Continue reading The House on Adeline Street

There’s a house on the corner of Adeline and Eddy Streets that doesn’t fit in. The rest of the block is lined with soft-colored clapboard houses with peeling paint or dented siding. Many are separated from the sidewalk by wire fences, some of which have begun to lean over or cave in. But 54 Adeline Street is a dramatically sloping A-frame made out of stark-white wooden panels. Large, glossy, rectangular bay windows pop out from its sides. Its concrete porch contains a built-in metal flower. . . Read more
Laura Glesby
The Right to Bargain

As a light rain fell on New Haven, hundreds of teachers, students, and labor organizers walked in silence down College Street. The April 25 march, which had the gravity of a funeral procession, began outside the Methodist Church across from Battell Chapel and ended at a white tent erected in front of Yale University President … Continue reading The Right to Bargain

As a light rain fell on New Haven, hundreds of teachers, students, and labor organizers walked in silence down College Street. The April 25 march, which had the gravity of a funeral procession, began outside the Methodist Church across from Battell Chapel and ended at a white tent erected in front of Yale University President Peter Salovey’s house on Hillhouse Avenue. Rising to address the crowd on a makeshift stage, Maria Elena Durazo, the Democratic National Committee Vice Chair, drew parallels between graduate student teachers’. . . Read more
Amy Xu
Expecting an Education

For a long time, the Polly T. McCabe Center wasn’t somewhere you went because you wanted to. You went because you had no other choice. At least, not really: If you were a pregnant teenager in New Haven, you needed a place where you could learn to feed your baby and change diapers and escape … Continue reading Expecting an Education

For a long time, the Polly T. McCabe Center wasn’t somewhere you went because you wanted to. You went because you had no other choice. At least, not really: If you were a pregnant teenager in New Haven, you needed a place where you could learn to feed your baby and change diapers and escape from the smirks and stares of your classmates, and you were not going to find that at your normal middle or high school. So you went to Polly McCabe, an. . . Read more
Vivian Wang
Resistance on the Corner

For years, a few local women have stood by the road, calling for peace.

At 11:30 a.m. on the Sunday after President Donald Trump’s Inauguration, Susan Klein dons a floppy maroon hat with a pink “Women for Peace” button planted proudly on the front, straps on a red fanny pack stuffed with fliers, and steps out the door. It’s a half-hour walk from her home near Westville to the triangular island at the corner of Broadway and Park Street in New Haven, across from Christ Church and Maison Mathis. By noon, she’s in position, holding up a silver Styrofoam. . . Read more
Mark Rosenberg
The Thing We Carry

ID cards have given us access to Yale since the ‘90s. What do they signify?

When Miko McGinty was a senior at Yale in 1993, she could get in anywhere. Most students on campus lugged around three keys at all times (one for their college’s courtyard, one for their entryway, and one for their suite), and still had to wait outside the gates of other residential colleges until a sympathetic student let them in. McGinty made no such sacrifices: as the owner of a master key passed down from an upperclassman friend, she was one of only about ten students. . . Read more
Annie Rosenthal
Ethically Enrolled?

Thomas Pogge stands in the doorway of a classroom in Linsly-Chittenden Hall, surrounded by a gaggle of students. He’s just finished teaching “Global Financial Integrity,” a Yale college seminar that meets Mondays at 3:30 p.m., in style: ten minute late, to rousing applause. On a Monday afternoon like this, well into Yale’s fall semester, it’s … Continue reading Ethically Enrolled?

Thomas Pogge stands in the doorway of a classroom in Linsly-Chittenden Hall, surrounded by a gaggle of students. He’s just finished teaching “Global Financial Integrity,” a Yale college seminar that meets Mondays at 3:30 p.m., in style: ten minute late, to rousing applause. On a Monday afternoon like this, well into Yale’s fall semester, it’s easy to forget that just a few months earlier, Pogge was publicly accused of sexual misconduct. Last spring, in a Buzzfeed News article entitled “Ethics and the Eye of the. . . Read more
Sarah Holder
Made Here

A sticker helps small businesses show their pride in a post-industrial city

Matthew Freiner sits in his makeshift office on the second floor of the Devil’s Gear Bike Shop on Orange Street, leaning back in his folding chair. His desk is piled with random notes, and an array of cycling suits is tacked to the wall. Since 2001, he has designed and printed his own t-shirts and stickers, in addition to fixing bikes and selling gear. Freiner loves making things, but making them in New Haven, he says, is especially rewarding. “Ugh, God. It’s colossal,” he said.. . . Read more
Matt Klineman
Vanishing Winchester

An urban explorer documents the former gun factory before it transforms.

Bryan Buckley, a lanky 23-year-old wedding photographer and welder from New Bedford, Massachusetts, pulls into the parking lot of the Winchester Lofts in his red Volkswagen. He is not interested in the new loft apartments but in the decaying walls and boarded-up windows immediately adjacent to them. He wears a hoodie, jeans, and a baseball cap. His face is smooth and boyish. He takes out his phone and pulls up a satellite image of the block on which we’re parked, which shows the sections of. . . Read more
Isabelle Taft