Editors’ Note, Volume 50, Issue 5

Dear readers, The New Journal’s history begins in 1967, when our intrepid founders took it upon themselves to create a publication suited to cover the city and the University in an era of seismic change. This issue, we’re turning back the clock 175 million years, to another era of seismic change: the moment when Connecticut … Continue reading Editors’ Note, Volume 50, Issue 5

Dear readers, The New Journal’s history begins in 1967, when our intrepid founders took it upon themselves to create a publication suited to cover the city and the University in an era of seismic change. This issue, we’re turning back the clock 175 million years, to another era of seismic change: the moment when Connecticut broke off from Pangaea. In our first piece sponsored by the Edward B. Bennett III Memorial Fund, Christine Xu explores how Connecticut’s geological history has shaped New Haven’s development and. . . Read more
Various Authors
Multiple Choice

What is the future of education in New Haven? With the city up in arms, three schools may hold the answer.

Photo by Vivek Suri. A. Pointing Fingers “You’re about to get sued,” New Haven Board of Education member Darnell Goldson warned, swiveling his chair to the right and pointing at Ed Joyner, the Board’s President. Joyner stood, microphone in hand, as the crowd of community members packing the auditorium of Beecher School looked on. He turned towards Goldson and leaned forward, his gold tie swinging to and fro, until their faces were a foot apart. “You know what? We can go to Bowen Field,” Joyner bellowed,. . . Read more
Mark Rosenberg
A Mage in the Making

Raising a demonic army on Chapel Street is a great way to put off homework.

Illustration by Felicia Chang. The swarthy Hero of Iroas scowled, swept back his crimson cape, and put up his fists. Kytheon’s Irregulars drew their swords. The demonic Master of the Feast rose on his bat’s wings. Cameron surveyed his army, considered his odds, and called for a frontal assault. In that moment, I knew that I had him. It was a small mistake: a slight overextension of his forces, a bit of cockiness from an experienced mage who was certain his amateur adversary wouldn’t notice. . . Read more
Henry Reichard
Anatomy of Observation

Open up your coffers and caress air Rugged waters and minerals leap to grasp peach skies Remember the geometry of birds was never meant to appeal to you. You, small observer, trust these blissful aromas.   Unfold the machinery of your heart. Cosmic stories are written into the spaces you’ve forgotten to fill. Below the … Continue reading Anatomy of Observation

Open up your coffers and caress air Rugged waters and minerals leap to grasp peach skies Remember the geometry of birds was never meant to appeal to you. You, small observer, trust these blissful aromas.   Unfold the machinery of your heart. Cosmic stories are written into the spaces you’ve forgotten to fill. Below the jade currents are golden silts. Follow full and follow slowly.   You, ocean of a man, lower your tide and see how the sand around you dries. Expose anchors of. . . Read more
Fernando Rojas
The Shipping News

What will an expansion of the Port of New Haven mean for the workers down at the docks?

Photo by Vivek Suri. Michael Vasaturo leads me through maritime fog that covers the Port of New Haven one cool March morning. The cranes of the bulk freighter Cyrenaica G. loom in the blurry distance. As the short, gold-necklaced Vasaturo and I walk along the wharf of New Haven Terminal (NHT), the shipping company where he serves as executive director, he describes a project poised to change the future of the local shipping industry. “The biggest thing that’s going on right now is trying to. . . Read more
Dimitri Diagne
The Music at the Margins

A group of undergrads is working overtime to get Yale to take jazz seriously.

Illustration by Felicia Chang. The Saybrook Underbrook, a performance space in the basement of the college, is unusually packed. The crowd spills over from rows of chairs and onto the stairs. They’re all waiting for New York Times-featured saxophonist Steve Wilson featured with his pianist and friend Pete Malinverni. Whispers of anticipation fill the room as the performers explain that they will play whatever music speaks to them. Malinverni’s feet zealously tap to the beat as his fingers dance around the keys. Wilson carries the. . . Read more
Amanda Thomas
A Vocal Revival

The stakes are high for Native American Yalies fighting to learn their own languages.

Photo by Robbie Short. As the golden sun begins to tumble down the horizon, the Native American Cultural Center, or NACC, comes to life. The lights in the conference room buzz on, illuminating wooden tables accented with a dotting of pastel chairs: sky blue, lavender, mint. It’s Monday night, and I’m attending a class in Lakȟóta, a Native American language spoken by around two thousand people in North and South Dakota.  There are five students in class tonight. While each belongs to the Lakȟóta nation,. . . Read more
Katherine Hu
I (Almost) Got Clobbered By Your Mom

Connecticut’s roller derby community bashes heads and bucks gender norms.

  Illustration by Julia Hedges. Krazy Legz Nikki is barreling down a flat track in quad skates, looking for Your Mom. Your Mom, a blocker, has a decision to make: she can either help Legz, her jammer, carve through a glut of skate-wearing women, or she can get in the way of the opposing jammer, Sass Squash. To make it through unscathed, Legz will have to “dance by” Lehigh Valley’s blockers using the precise footwork she’s been practicing since 2012. Or she can just barrel. . . Read more
Jacob Sweet
Gilding the Green

A private organization rebrands the center of New Haven.

  Illustration by Julia Hedges. “Welcome to the Town Green District!” says Win Davis, Town Green Services’ Executive Director, sitting against an office wall branded with the organization’s logo as he smiles mildly at the camera. “Let’s look at some of the meaningful ways that we make downtown New Haven a better place for everybody.” Shifting images fill the screen: a lamp-lit thoroughfare, a crowd gathered to watch a broadcast of the World Cup. Scenes of hardworking “downtown ambassadors” hanging potted plants and sweeping sidewalks. . . Read more
Talia Schechet
Playing Sick

Meet the people performing pain to teach doctors to listen.

Illustration by Meher Hans. Aryan Patel, a 30-year-old therapist, sits before a fidgeting first-year medical student. Aryan needs medical attention: He has a fever, severe nasal congesion, and a sharp constant pain in his right cheek bone. He anxiously kneads his knee with his hand, unable to stop thinking about his blood tests: are his blood sugar levels too high? The medical student clasps his hands together and nods nervously. “Oh, I see. Okay,” he says. He runs through the script in his mind: Elicit. . . Read more
Rachel Koh