Editors’ Note — Volume 51, Issue 4

Dear readers, The time? April 2015. The place? Payne Whitney Gymnasium. Dazed by the floodlights overhead and the pearly-white smiles of our high-achieving peers, we wandered the extracurricular bazaar at Bulldog Days. Ballroom dancers besieged us. We could have become stars of the polo team. Every single improv group wanted us, bad. Instead, we each … Continue reading Editors’ Note — Volume 51, Issue 4

Dear readers, The time? April 2015. The place? Payne Whitney Gymnasium. Dazed by the floodlights overhead and the pearly-white smiles of our high-achieving peers, we wandered the extracurricular bazaar at Bulldog Days. Ballroom dancers besieged us. We could have become stars of the polo team. Every single improv group wanted us, bad. Instead, we each ended up at a table in the back staffed by scruffy-looking representatives of an unregistered organization who had snuck their way in. The nice people at The Magazine About Yale. . . Read more
Various Authors
Five Beers Deep at the Union Station Sbarro

A discount at a train station offers an evening of intoxication.

Illustration by Merritt Barnwell. Right outside the Sbarro, near the bottom of the escalator in New Haven’s Union Station, tucked around a corner like a rarely-played side quest in a video game, is a sign from another universe. It says, “Buy 4 Beers, Get the 5th for a Penny.” Now, I can imagine a universe in which I would order one beer at the Union Station Sbarro. A universe in which it’s a quarter past five, say, and my train home is delayed by yet. . . Read more
Mariah Kreutter
Facing the Flood

As seas rise, New Haven enacts an ambitious plan to combat climate change.

Illustration by Merritt Barnwell. “This house is 115 years old,” Sal DeCola said as he guided me into a bright sunroom overlooking deep blue waters. It was one o’clock in the afternoon, clear skies, and low tide. We stood in DeCola’s home in Morris Cove, a neighborhood on the east bank of New Haven Harbor that he represents as an alder. The waves pushed up against a dark concrete barrier extending below the other dozen houses along the beach. DeCola patted the wall of the. . . Read more
Sarah Adams
In the Red

Can Ned Lamont save Connecticut from a staggering budget crisis?

On September 17, at the Shubert Theatre, two blocks from Old Campus, Democratic gubernatorial candidate Ned Lamont took the stage for his second general election debate. Dressed in a crisp suit, not a hair astray, Lamont looked equal parts politician and businessman. Standing in front of televisions emblazoned with a large American flag, he battled Republican nominee Bob Stefanowski for almost an hour. Lamont fielded jab after jab about his privileged upbringing and his similarity to former governor Dannel Malloy, who left office with a. . . Read more
Conor Johnson
what you told me about the fig tree

first the story: mark and the others chanced upon the tree, but it did not bear fruit. so the disciples went hungry, and jesus cursed the tree, and the fig tree withered and died. second: you are the impotent tree, the circumstances the winter, and i am mark, who will not be fed. you tell … Continue reading what you told me about the fig tree

first the story: mark and the others chanced upon the tree, but it did not bear fruit. so the disciples went hungry, and jesus cursed the tree, and the fig tree withered and died. second: you are the impotent tree, the circumstances the winter, and i am mark, who will not be fed. you tell me at some point you will bear fruit but just not now. the time is not right, and the shape of our surroundings is not right, and your mind is. . . Read more
Rachel Koh
Mind Matter

Yale neuroscientists are probing the human brain for the secrets of consciousness.

Photo by Yehia Elkersh. Kate Christison-Lagay grabbed a rubber brain off a countertop in the basement of Yale School of Medicine’s library and pried its two halves apart so that we could have a look inside. As a postdoctoral fellow in Dr. Hal Blumenfeld’s research lab, Christison-Lagay studies sensory perception, which she and her team believe can provide a model for human consciousness. She speaks seriously and energetically about brains, and clearly knows her way around one. After separating one of the lobes, she pointed. . . Read more
Matthew Kleiner
How to Solve Everything

Yale’s effective altruists strive for an ethical lifestyle.

Illustration by Sam Oldshue. Frankie Andersen-Wood stood beside a projected cartoon of a light bulb with its filament twisted into the shape of a heart. In front of her, five Yale students sat along one side of a seminar table. Upbeat pop music played in the background. “Effective altruism isn’t something you can just learn about in two hours,” said Andersen-Wood, co-president of Yale Effective Altruism (YEA), going off-script from her presentation at YEA’s spring information session. She spoke quickly and in a soft English. . . Read more
Eli Mennerick
A Good Hat is Hard to Find

New Haven’s lone hat shop recalls a bygone era.

Illustration by Merritt Barnwell. “A hat is a timeless piece,” Ben DelMonico declares. The manager of New Haven’s DelMonico Hatter sits across from me in Java Café with a mint tea, tapping the visor of his grey wool baseball cap. His hat — a Wigens, he informs me — complements his crisp button-down and grey wool sweater. Ben chooses his words carefully, massaging one hand with the other as he focuses on a point over my shoulder. The 44-year-old New Haven native isn’t used to. . . Read more
Beasie Goddu
Robert Zirpolo’s Flying Machine

A hot air balloonist soars high above Connecticut.

Design by Merritt Barnwell. Most flying machines are undeniably cool. Jets, sleek and swift, play chicken with the ends of runways to earn their ascent. Helicopters, brash and insectile, thump the earth from their skids with blades that whir with lethal intent. But humanity’s earliest aircraft is different. The hot air balloon has never been much more than a flammable fabric sack, connected to an equally flammable wicker basket, powered by a giant flamethrower and stuffed with passengers whose quarter- to mid-life crises aren’t severe. . . Read more
Robert Scaramuccia
Pike’s Pattern of Neglect

Student tenants claim that Pike International, one of New Haven’s biggest real-estate developers, has failed to maintain their homes.

Photo by Robbie Short. On the evening of June 26, Erika Lopez was curling up on the couch to watch TV after a day of work at the District Attorney’s office in Manhattan when her phone buzzed. The words that flashed across the screen made her stomach drop. Jheri Richards, Lopez’s off-campus housemate, had frantically texted her that a Yale student staying in New Haven over the summer had been walking past the Kappa Alpha Theta sorority house at 277 Crown Street, where Lopez and. . . Read more
Candice Wang