Resistance on the Corner

For years, a few local women have stood by the road, calling for peace.

At 11:30 a.m. on the Sunday after President Donald Trump’s Inauguration, Susan Klein dons a floppy maroon hat with a pink “Women for Peace” button planted proudly on the front, straps on a red fanny pack stuffed with fliers, and steps out the door. It’s a half-hour walk from her home near Westville to the triangular island at the corner of Broadway and Park Street in New Haven, across from Christ Church and Maison Mathis. By noon, she’s in position, holding up a silver Styrofoam. . . Read more
Mark Rosenberg
The Week After

New Haven communities react to Donald Trump’s election

On Election Day, New Haven was on the wrong side of a historic upset. Over thirty-four thousand Elm City voters cast ballots for Hillary Clinton; just under five thousand chose president-elect Donald J. Trump. After the race was over—settled in far-away places like southwest Virginia and Kenosha County, Wisconsin—the result dominated conversations all over the city, sparking endless debates about its significance and what to expect from a Trump presidency. The following vignettes are not meant to offer a comprehensive portrait of New Haven residents’. . . Read more
Various Authors
Montana, Running Back

Just past midnight on August 19, as the rest of the Yale football team slept before the first day of fall camp, Andrew Grinde made his getaway. The five-foot-eleven freshman running back slipped out of his room in Lanman-Wright Hall, taking care not to rouse his roommates, and walked out to High Street, where an … Continue reading Montana, Running Back

Just past midnight on August 19, as the rest of the Yale football team slept before the first day of fall camp, Andrew Grinde made his getaway. The five-foot-eleven freshman running back slipped out of his room in Lanman-Wright Hall, taking care not to rouse his roommates, and walked out to High Street, where an Uber awaited him at the curb. He rode to Union Station, then boarded a night train to Philadelphia. By the time Grinde’s teammates woke up, he was long gone. He’d. . . Read more
Mark Rosenberg