Editors’ Note — Volume 51, Issue 2

Dear readers, It’s been quite a month. On September 23, The New Yorker reported that Debbie Ramirez had accused Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of exposing himself to her in a Lawrance dorm during their first year at Yale. Glued to the livestream between classes, Yale students watched the Senate Judiciary Committee interrogate a woman … Continue reading Editors’ Note — Volume 51, Issue 2

Dear readers, It’s been quite a month. On September 23, The New Yorker reported that Debbie Ramirez had accused Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of exposing himself to her in a Lawrance dorm during their first year at Yale. Glued to the livestream between classes, Yale students watched the Senate Judiciary Committee interrogate a woman eager to be “helpful” as she shared memories of trauma, and a graduate of our college who responded to allegations of assault with red-faced indignation. Our leaders –– nationally, and. . . Read more
Various Authors
It is the first day of autumn

Illustration by Meher Hans. — Oriana Tang is a senior in Saybrook College.

Illustration by Meher Hans. — Oriana Tang is a senior in Saybrook College.. . . Read more
Oriana Tang
Until It Cracks

Illustration by Merritt Barnwell. “Pick one that doesn’t say ‘Made in China,’ Mariah,” my mother says, the words clipped as usual, but drawn out by a Georgia drawl. (You wouldn’t think a drawl could be clipped, but my mother, in this as in so many things, defies expectations.) She always drawls when Grandmama visits. Actually, … Continue reading Until It Cracks

Illustration by Merritt Barnwell. “Pick one that doesn’t say ‘Made in China,’ Mariah,” my mother says, the words clipped as usual, but drawn out by a Georgia drawl. (You wouldn’t think a drawl could be clipped, but my mother, in this as in so many things, defies expectations.) She always drawls when Grandmama visits. Actually, it doesn’t even take that much. Once when we were driving through acres and acres of some valley somewhere in Kentucky on some black November night, the only light coming. . . Read more
Mariah Kreutter
The Scientist and the Shrub

Michael Donoghue is the world’s leading expert on a plant that no one’s ever heard of.

Photo by Vivek Suri. “This is yesterday’s flower,” Michael Donoghue said, pointing to a half-wilted bloom. He was standing in the middle of a greenhouse, surrounded by students. The room was filled with insectivorous plants and deciduous trees, the air heavy with pollen and moisture. The plant before Donoghue had heart-shaped leaves, a spindly stem wrapped around a wire brace like ivy, and two huge burgundy flowers that drooped despondently. It was labeled Aristolochia gigantea. “And this is today’s,” Donoghue added, pointing to the larger. . . Read more
Henry Reichard
Justice Unconfirmed

As Brett Kavanaugh heads to the Supreme Court, his legacy looms over Yale’s campus.

Illustration by Sam Oldshue. The decorations in the suite on the first floor of entryway B in Lawrance Hall are relatively sparse. When Barbara Mola, Emma Lewer, Macrina Wang, Sofia Ortega-Guerrero, and Kara O’Rourke, all first-years in Ezra Stiles College, moved into their dorm at the end of August, the tall white walls were drab and unassuming. The suitemates have since added some decor: string lights, a fruit bowl, a gray rug that occasionally doubles as a yoga mat, and a tapestry depicting the New. . . Read more
Mark Rosenberg
Art of the State

Northwest of New Haven, the first museum in the Americas dedicated to Palestinian art has opened its doors.

Photograph by Margaret Olin, as part of “Making Time,” her series of images from the Dheisheh Refugee Camp, just south of Bethlehem. Woodbridge, Connecticut, a sleepy suburb fifteen minutes northwest of downtown New Haven, is an unlikely home for Palestine Museum U.S.—the first and only museum in the Americas dedicated solely to Palestinian history, culture, and art. Woodbridge has a sizable Jewish population: two Jewish community centers and three synagogues flank the museum. It’s exactly the kind of place where one might expect a museum. . . Read more
Leila Murphy
Jesus Christ, Superstar

A new church on College Street is attempting to convert the masses with guitar riffs and blowtorches.

Design by Meher Hans. Every Sunday morning around 6:00 a.m., the interior of College Street Music Hall undergoes a subtle metamorphosis. The bar is shuttered, coffee urns appear in the front lobby, and rows of chairs replace the Saturday-night concert detritus strewn about the 2,000-person venue. The concert lights and an earplug dispenser stay in place. Church starts at 8:30. As congregants meander into the building under a marquee advertising this season’s concert lineup, which features Dirty Heads and Lil Yachty, volunteers clad in black. . . Read more
Noah Macey
Broke by Design

As expenses pile up, low-income art students at Yale are forced to curtail their creativity.

Photo by Robbie Short. This fall, Adam Moftah’s expenses added up quickly. He spent $15 Xeroxing old graphic designs to make new compositions for a project. Then, after he turned the project in, he learned from his professor that he’d approached the assignment incorrectly, and would have to start anew. Meanwhile, he had two credit card bills due soon — nearly $200 for books, school supplies, and other expenses from the start of the semester. For Moftah, a senior from New York City, majoring in. . . Read more
Zola Canady
A Hard Pill to Swallow

Science research at Yale is funded by the family responsible for the opioid crisis. Faculty members don’t seem to care.

Design by Rachel Wolf. Yale cell biology professor Yongli Zhang conducts his research using tiny tweezers. These aren’t tweezers you’d find hanging in the CVS beauty section. They’re far too small to pluck your eyebrows: about one hundred of them, bunched up, are as thick as a single human hair. With the aid of a microscope, you’d see that the tweezers are used to manipulate tiny glass beads. Together, one or two beads work to trap and apply force onto a single molecule. Using these. . . Read more
Candice Wang
Bias in Blue

Bringing forth new allegations, Black students and New Haven residents say that Yale’s police presence has threatened their sense of safety and belonging.

Editors’ note: This article has been updated from the print version to reflect a response from GPSCY, the social center that operates the graduate student bar mentioned below. Editors’ note: A previous version of this article stated that Michael Sierra-Arévalo, the Assistant Professor at Rutgers School of Criminal Justice, conducted an ethnography of the New Haven Police Department. That is incorrect; Sierra-Arévalo has worked with the NHPD, but has not conducted an ethnography of the Department. Around two o’clock in the morning, on May 8, Lolade. . . Read more
Laura Glesby