Psych and the Dorm Life

Trouble getting along with your roommate? It’s all in your head.

Most first-years walk into their dorms knowing little more about their suitemates than their names, who’s bringing the microwave, and the Facebook likes from middle school that still haunt each person’s profile. (A highlight from my freshman suite: “Bring back the word ‘wizard’ as an adjective.”) The residential college deans are the ones who do the heavy lifting for roommate selection, with the aid of that (very) cursory survey the prefrosh fill out. All I remember from that survey is marking “no country, no metal”. . . Read more
Noah Macey
Who’s Laughing Now?

Women are at the center of a revolution in Yale’s comedy scene.

Five women strut onto a makeshift stage with a smug swagger. The audience that fills the auditorium in Yale’s Linsly-Chittenden Hall is already laughing. With their baseball caps tilted sideways on their heads—and scratching their nether regions—the performers lumber to a line of chairs. “Do we really think it’s a good idea to be taking ‘men’ out of ‘comedy’?” asks Ned, played by Raffi Donatich, in an aggressively deep voice. “Then it would just be ‘Cody’,” Fred, played by Sarah Al-Shalash, replies, screwing up her. . . Read more
Max Himpe
close proximity to a god of the industrial workforce

me and god, we took three trains to get from one side of the city to another in those long rambling railway hours we exchanged the words of               lovers oh ! but god’s                                  … Continue reading close proximity to a god of the industrial workforce

me and god, we took three trains to get from one side of the city to another in those long rambling railway hours we exchanged the words of               lovers oh ! but god’s                                     laughter! oh ! but god’s                                    whispers! there was something more than love. . . Read more
Sohum Pal
Porcelain

1. On a layover in El Salvador, I noticed the staring. I kept locking eyes with strangers—the old man by the window, a woman digging through her purse, the child coming out of the bathroom. I felt flattered until I heard, “¿Quién es la china?” China: a small porcelain doll on display for the world … Continue reading Porcelain

1. On a layover in El Salvador, I noticed the staring. I kept locking eyes with strangers—the old man by the window, a woman digging through her purse, the child coming out of the bathroom. I felt flattered until I heard, “¿Quién es la china?” China: a small porcelain doll on display for the world to see, fragile, foreign, china. 2. I grew up reading the Western classics in Korean. They came in full-shelf packages: Les Miserablés, Little Women, King Lear, translated to satiate a. . . Read more
Kyung Mi Lee
The Lessons of Roberto Lugo

In the world of the “ghetto potter,” it takes a mess to make art.

Spectators in the luminous gallery room of Artspace press up against one another, wary of bumping into the artwork on display. Detailed portraits, written messages, penciled outlines, and colorful decals cover the walls. Music commences, and the attendees part, making way for 15-year-old Jordan Walker. He struts in time with a pulsating house beat. When he reaches the other side of the room, a grand-finale backbend provokes wild applause. The music ends, and Walker poses in front of his portrait: Olympic gymnast Simone Biles, her. . . Read more
Addee Kim and Sarah Pillard
Hard Drives, Harder Questions

In Yale’s archives, digital records provide a new portal to the past.

“Can you imagine what it might be like for a child whose parents are not allowed to be married?” The day was March 26, 2007. Anna Heller, a 39-year-old social worker from Willimantic, Connecticut, testified during a twelve-hour hearing before the Connecticut legislature on H.B. 7395, which would grant same-sex couples in the state the right to marriage. She spoke on behalf of Love Makes a Family, an organization that lobbied for the bill. Heller’s testimony, and the rest Love Makes a Family’s records, are. . . Read more
Amber Hu
On the Doorstep

In New Haven, eviction feeds into a cycle of poverty that’s hard to escape.

One Little Box Grace Luysterborghs lives on the fourth floor of the Robert T. Wolfe Apartments, in a studio apartment with big windows overlooking Union Station. But she likes to keep her curtains closed. It’s “one little box,” she says. There’s a bathroom right by the entrance, a tiny closet, a small kitchen, then her bed and dresser. Luysterborghs was thankful when she secured her apartment in the Wolfe complex at 49 Union Avenue, a New Haven Housing Authority–owned property for the elderly and disabled,. . . Read more
Eliza Fawcett
Bridgeport’s Big Gamble

A casino titan says it can help a struggling city. A coalition with $800 in the bank wants to stop it.

I. The East End When he first heard about the casino, Dr. Charlie Stallworth, a Connecticut state representative and the pastor of East End Baptist Tabernacle Church in Bridgeport, was skeptical. He didn’t think the developer, MGM Resorts International, was serious about the project, and he didn’t like the advertising campaign they were running. “Maybe I’m not the brightest guy in the room,” he remembers thinking, “but don’t try and manipulate me.” So, last September, when Stallworth heard about a press conference and groundbreaking ceremony. . . Read more
Steven Lance
The Price of Freedom

Cash bail keeps low-income people locked up. In New Haven and New York, two organizations are fighting against it, with different consequences for their communities.

I. The first thing one notices when walking up to the entrance of the Vernon C. Bain Center (VBC) in New York City is the fetid smell coming from the Fulton Fish Market next door. The road leading up to VBC has no sidewalks—just barbed wire fences. Queens shimmers across the East River. Some of the inmates at VBC—known as The Boat, since it’s anchored six feet from shore—are serving short-term sentences, from thirty days to a few months, for low-level misdemeanors. The vast majority. . . Read more
Isaac Scobey-Thal